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How to Protect Your Teeth After a Sweet Treat


Posted on 3/10/2019 by Pacific Oral and Facial Surgery Center
How to Protect Your Teeth After a Sweet TreatWe know we've been preaching a lot about sugar and why you need to avoid it to maintain that beautiful healthy smile you regularly post on social media. Having said all that, we also know that every once in a while, you deserve to treat yourself to a sweet treat.

Special occasions, such as birthdays and holidays are made for indulging (however briefly) in a dessert. How do you protect your teeth after indulging in a dessert? Keep reading for some great tips.

Preventing Sugar Damage

Here are three ways you can protect your teeth from sugar damage. If you think about preventing tooth decay and plan ahead, you can indulge in dessert without doing any permanent damage.

First, while many people have dessert in between meals, it is actually better to indulge in dessert during a meal to protect your teeth. If you are eating dessert at the end of a meal, the sugar particles will have a harder time sticking to your teeth.

Second, if you make the decision to eat a dessert, eat something with healthy fats at the same time. The fats help to break down the sugar in the dessert, which helps to protect your teeth. Examples of healthy fats that might go with a dessert- coconut oil can be used to make the dessert; or yogurt and cream to top the dessert.

Third, if you are craving candy, dark chocolate is less harmful than milk chocolate, candy canes or chewy candies like caramels. Sucking on candy such as candy canes means that you are sucking on sugar for an extended period of time raises the level of sugar in your mouth for an extended period of time. In addition, sticky sweets such as caramels mean that a chunk of the candy stays on your teeth for a while before you brush it off, and if you miss a spot, it could be on there for hours.

Need more information on keeping your teeth healthy? Give us a call!


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The surgical specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery requires up to six additional years of hospital based surgical and anesthesia training beyond dental school.
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