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Does Jaw Clicking Mean Your Jaw is Breaking?



Posted on 4/15/2020 by Pacific Oral and Facial Surgery Center
Does Jaw Clicking Mean Your Jaw is Breaking? The first time you hear your jaw start to click, you may think nothing of it. But after it keeps happening, you may start to think that there is a serious problem. Many people think jaw clicking is a sign that their jaw is breaking or cracking and seek medical attention at an emergency room. However, a clicking jaw is usually not an indication of a broken jaw. A clicking jaw is usually related to a condition known as bruxism. Bruxism is the medical terminology for grinding of the teeth. Many people who grind their teeth don't know that they do it because they might do it while they sleep at night. Grinding of the teeth puts a lot of pressure on your jaw muscle and it causes a lot of stress.

What Could Cause The Clicking?

People who suffer from bruxism often have a disorder called temporomandibular disorder (TMD). TMD—sometimes referred to as TMJ—is a disorder of the jaw muscle that helps you open and close your mouth. When this muscle becomes stressed due to bruxism, people often experience a clicking sound in their jaw when they eat or talk. Severe forms of TMD can make it impossible to eat and talk normally. The best protection against TMD is to stop grinding your teeth. One way to do this is to be mindful of when you are grinding your teeth. During the daytime it may be easy to tell yourself to loosen up your jaw, but while you're sleeping it's impossible. For this, we can help. We offer custom-fitted mouth guards to protect your jaw and teeth during the night. Our mouth guard is personally fitted to your exact specifications so that it provides the most protection possible while still being comfortable. If you're interested in a mouth guard, call our office, and we'll help you with the process.
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Phone: Phone: 209-835-4600 • Fax: Fax: 209-835-8833